Recipe Conversion Charts

 

I was recently asked why I confuse people by using metric.


   Actually, I am trying to avoid confusion. In the commonly used system, avoirdupois, the ounce can be a measurement of either volume or weight.
   If I say "Add 8 ounces of rice", do I mean half a pound of rice or a cup of rice?
Obviously they are not the same.
   Another factor comes into this: although we were taught that "a pint's a pound the world around", this is not true. In the UK, a cup is 10 fl oz, not 8 fl oz as in the US. This means a UK pint is 20 fl oz as opposed to 16 fl oz in the US.
   So, I think that I have now established that the terms ounce, cup, pint, quart and gallon are not to be trusted from country to country.
   Since the Internet crosses the boundaries, a cookbook prepared for it needs to depend on a clear, consistent standard.
   I recall that my Pyrex measuring cup in my home in the States had avoirdupois on one side and metric on the other. That was 30 years ago. I am sure that they are easily obtained.

For my full recipe book, free, go to:  David Nale's Recipe Book

 

Volume Measurement (dry or liquid)
Metric
American
250 ml
1 cup
188 ml
3/4 cup
167 ml
2/3 cup
125 ml
1/2 cup
83 ml
1/3 cup
63 ml
1/4 cup
15 ml
1 tablespoon (tbsp)
5 ml
1 teaspoon (tsp)

 

Weight
Metric
American
1 kilogram
2.2 pounds (35 ounces)
454 grams
1 pound (16 ounces)
227 grams
1/2 pound (8 ounces)
113 grams
1/4 pound (4 ounces)
28 grams
1 ounce

 

Temperature
Celsius
Fahrenheit
Description
Gas Mark
140
275
Slow
1
150
300
Very Moderate
2
165
325
Moderate
3
180
350
Moderate
4
190
375
Hot
5
200
400
Hot
6
220
425
Very Hot
7
230
450
Very Hot
8
240
475
Very Hot
9
260
500
Very Hot
10

 

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